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Posts Tagged ‘Vintage’

Dirt Bike Reunion - Yamaha WR450F

Dirt Bike Reunion – Yamaha WR450F

People love story.  It’s the essence of novels, TV and film.  It also explains why reality TV has so many script writers and how phony rules in America.

This video took me back to the dirt-whirling days on my Honda CT70 (HERE) and more recently with buddies on the Oregon coast range on the old Yamaha YZ400 (HERE).  What a terrific dirt bike, that smoker 2-stroke was!

Everybody says they want shorter info snippets, but what they really want is something that rivets them.  They’ve got endless time for great, and this video is just that – great!  Prop’s to Mark Toia.

Feel AliveI think travel gives you perspective.  Be it trail rides, sand dunes or the longer wind in the face road trips.  You see satisfaction is unexpected.  In other words, it’s when you’re riding down the open road (or trail) behind the handle bars that you’ll suddenly realize you love your life.

I’m not sure about you, but I’ve noticed that one-time events… seem to happen all the time, and as I age I’m less susceptible to the hype.  This video about 4 friends that use to ride and hang out as kids and reunite atop their favorite hills was inspiring.

Photo courtesy of Toia.com

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NW Hog Lamp - In the Shop

Old motorcycles represent good memories for me and I suspect for many of you reading this blog.

Honda introduced the CB750 motorcycle to the U.S. in 1969.  The bike was targeted directly at the U.S. market after company officials fully understood the opportunity for a larger bike.  It had 750-cc, 4-cylinder SOHC engine, electric start and disc brakes.  The motorcycle set the bar very high for manufactures.  Disc front brake and an inline four cylinder engine were previously unavailable on mainstream production bikes. And with a price under $1500 (U.S.) it had significant advantages over British competition.

All those new motorcycles left Japan for America and some forty odd years later you’ll find them forgotten in the auto wrecking yards across this land.

Finished lamp on the desk

John Ryland scours the Richmond, Virginia junk yards in search of the motorcycles and their recycled parts.  His main business is rescuing and creating retro-cool-custom bikes from the rustic heaps.  Not the West Coast Chopper or OCC slick and polished, rather the brutally sparse and elegant.  You see the steel and welding is straight up and honest.  At the time he worked in an ad agency, but the economy had its way and what was a hobby began as full-time adventure building motorcycles from parts and frames he found in junkyards and classified ads. The operation is called – Classified Moto.

I ran across John while catching the tail end of a CNN segment that featured a custom motorcycle builder who on a whim decided to a build a lamp.  Yes, the kind that lights up your life, or workshop or home décor.

As I watched this behind the scenes video I could almost smell the gasoline, grease and arc welder as John grinded and then aligned the metal springs and shocks on his workbench along with the transmissions gears and brake rotors.  The walls in one corner of his ‘office’ were covered in chalkboards and scribbled notes about how the lamps were built.  I decided right then that I had to have one of these “Road Warrior” welded and hammered out creations and decided to upgrade my desk – Classified Style!

Born Date

I did the ‘Google’ and placed an order a couple months back.  I ordered up “Honda CB750” circa 1980.   Yeah, I run with V-twins these days, but I’m talking about the four-into-four exhaust pipes classic!  Japanese models are widely regarded as the purest specimens and besides many collector’s may well make this invaluable.  John’s wife Betsy helps out in the shop and she kept me up-to-date on the order as it progressed.  They are a real joy to work with.  At one point they were running low on parts and had to run a special ops into S.C. where they scored a truck load of parts to keep up with the high-demand.

So, to the spirit of those who still find adventure behind the grips of an old motorcycle I say check out Classified Moto.  You’ll be humbled as people walk past and look twice while saying cool lamp!

Photos taken by author and courtesy of Classified Moto.

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Moms or Mums as they say in “down under” never really approve of their children having a motorcycle and can you blame them?  They never seem to get beyond the “motorcycles are dangerous” stage.  Maybe it was watching you weave all over and fall off a bicycle when you were a little tike and first learned to ride that convinced her?  Or maybe it’s all the “other” people on the road that she worries about.  Who knows as everyone has a different reason to worry.

My parents agreed and bought my first “real” ride.  It was a Honda “Mini Trail” 70 (CT70). Sure I had a couple of solid frame mini-bikes with the 5HP Briggs & Stratton lawn mower engine prior and I’m sure the small wheels and mini-bike look of the Honda CT70 made them feel comfortable in buying it.

The bike was first introduced in 1970 to compete against all the two stroke small capacity motorcycles and was one of the first four-stroke, small capacity motorcycles of its time.  Unique were the fold down handle bars and many loaded up the bikes on the back of RV’s or campers and used them to motor around when traveling.  You could immediately tell by the angle of the decal on the center beam if it was a 3-speed “automatic clutch” (vertical) or a 4-speed (diagonal).  I have lots of stories and positive memories riding that motorcycle.   When ever I see one on display I just smile.

I’m sure being first introduced to this motorcycle in my teens infected me with an enthusiasm about riding that has lasted all my life.  I’ve owned multiple dirt and street bikes.  I find myself enjoying the wind in my face and the mini-adventures they bring along.

This Sunday is Mothers Day.   So, call your mom and/or thank her for that first motorcycle!

Photo courtesy of Honda Trail.

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