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Posts Tagged ‘Jonesers’

We’ve all heard the “Boomer” term or sound bite from advertisers or from the evening news anchor.  More recently there has been a lot of debate about the aging Harley demographic and Boomer accident/fatality rates on motorcycles.

But, if you are like me and recently turn another year older, I wasn’t clear on where the name Boomer was derived?   So, like millions of other web consumers that on a daily basis go on-line to find something or be entertained — I thought I’d best research this gap in knowledge.

The term comes from two primary audiences: the Baby Boomers Generation and Generation Jones – both born during the big 20-year, post-World War II boom in births from the mid-1940’s to mid-1960’s.

  • Baby Boomers were born 1942 to 1953; we associate their youth with Howdy Doody, Davy Crocket hats, and later, Woodstock and Vietnam War demonstrations.
  • Generation Jones, born 1954 to 1965, is a newer concept and name that represents the actual children of the sixties (more wide-eyed than tie-dyed); Jonesers were weaned on The Brady Bunch and Easy Bake Ovens and later were the teens of 70’s heavy metal, disco, punk and soul.

Wow, something new!  I’ve heard the urban slang of “Jones’ing for Something”, but never Generation Jones.  Today, Boomers are 53 to 64 years old and 16% of the adult U.S. population; Jonesers are 41 to 52 years old and 26% of all U.S. adults. Together they make up almost 80 Million people, arguably at the prime of their lives.

I shouldn’t really say “they,” but rather “we,” or “me” because many of us are part of one or the other generation.  I’m truly excited about this new generational paradigm. Generation Jones makes me feel young.  Having been the recipient of extensive major media coverage, AARP mailings and a need-not-apply elusive group of the 16-34-year-old MySpace group, I’m thinking this new “Jones” demographic is worth some buzz.

Jonesers were originally and mistakenly lumped in with the Boomers because of shared high birth rates.  But, generational personalities come from shared formative experiences, not head counts. The dramatically different formative experience of Boomers vs. Jonesers has created two very different generational personalities. I’ve never felt like a “Boomer” even with the AARP flyer in hand, but I totally “get” Jonesers, the differences as well as the similarities.  

I feel so much better now that I’ve redefine my own identity! Next I’ll be evangelizing how a cell phone is technology for anything other than talking?!

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