Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Cross-Roads’

2011 Cross Roads Custom

‘Tis the new model season and earlier in the week Victory Motorcycles provided information on its 2011 line-up at a dealers meeting in Orlando, FL.

The Medina, Minnesota-based company has been busy researching how to attract buyers in this challenging marketplace. They’ve been blacking-out components, beefing up engines, recalibrating transmissions, tuning the exhaust, and made ABS standard on several models.  For 2011 the company brings the introduction of 15 motorcycles.

Most newsworthy, however, was the manufacturer’s decision to use the new “Victory Freedom” 106/6 V-Twin in every model.  The powerplant is a 4-stroke, 50-degree, 106 cubic inch (1731cc) V-Twin (compression ratio 9.4:1).  There are two versions of the 106/6 powerplant. The first is called the “Freedom 106/6 Stage 2 V-Twin,” which has a special Stage 2 cam package that boosts its power numbers to a claimed 97 hp and 113 lb-ft of torque.   All of Victory’s cruiser models (Vegas Jackpot, Hammer, Hammer S, Vegas, Kingpin, all three 8-Ball cruisers, and the Zach Ness Signature Series Vegas 8-Ball) will come with this engine.  The second version is called the “Freedom 106/6 Stage 1 V-Twin” which puts out a claimed 92 hp and 109 lb-ft of torque and will power the remaining 2011 motorcycles, including the Cross Country, Cross Roads, Victory Vision Tour, and Arlen and Cory Ness’ Signature Series.

In addition the motorcycle manufacture updated its transmission to a “100K mile” warranty along with modifications aimed to reduce driveline lash, reduce gear whine and to make it easier for riders to shift into neutral at a stop courtesy of a “Neutral Assist.” It’s also said to improve ride-ability and deliver a more appealing-sounding transmission.

The new Cross Roads Custom touring bike will feature air-adjust rear suspension, dual disk front brakes and inverted forks.  The company also announced a new custom program, which allows a consumer to select the bike color, saddlebag style, highway bar style and possibly a windshield. All totaled, the consumer can select up to 48 possible combinations.

Photo courtesy of Victory Motorcycles.

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Polaris Industries -- Victory Motorcycles

Creativity.

There is a fascinating and quite boring article in ‘Newsweek’ about the creativity gap, how creativity is declining in America.  Reading it I couldn’t stop thinking about the motorcycle business and specifically Harley-Davidson.

Given it’s earning season; H-D announce earnings HERE, now it’s Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII), makers of the Victory motorcycles turn who reported its Q2’10 net income of $25.6 million.  By comparison, the 2009 second quarter net income was $17.5 million.  Sales for the second quarter 2010 totaled $430.9 million, an increase of 25% from $345.9 million recorded in the year-earlier period.

Scott Wine, Polaris’ CEO stated:

“Polaris maintained strong momentum in the second quarter, driven by solid market share gains, sales growth and margin expansion. Innovation and execution enabled us to deliver another quarter of solid operating results in an overall economic and powersports industry environment that remains sluggish.”

Yeah, but you’re likely saying that’s all ATV and snowmobile sales, right?  True the lions share is off-road sales, but specific to sales of the On-Road Division, which primarily consists of Victory motorcycles, they saw an increase of 48% during the second quarter of 2010 vs. the same period in 2009. The N.A. heavyweight cruiser and touring motorcycle industry remained weak during the quarter, but Victory motorcycles had strong retail sales during the second quarter, increasing more than 10% in N.A. compared to the second quarter last year, resulting in overall market share gains and retail sales growth for the third consecutive quarter. The increased demand reflects the popularity of the new 2010 Cross Country and Cross Roads touring models.   The N.A. dealer inventory of Victory motorcycles declined 32% in the Q2’10 compared to 2009 comparable levels. The sale of Victory motorcycles in markets outside of N.A. continues to accelerate, with sales reaching 25% of total On-Road/Victory sales for the year-to-date period.  And lastly the income from Polaris financial services was $4.2 million for Q2’10 compared to $4.0 million in 2009.

I can’t put my finger on it, but there is something missing for me with the Victory motorcycle.  Maybe it’s just the “bar-n-shield” logo and now my bias is showing?  But I balk at comments from riders that claim Victory is NOT a threat or competition for H-D… it just doesn’t ring true.  The cruisers are more roomy, the engine has more HP, the motorcycle is lighter, has a lower seat, larger saddlebags all at a cost of thousands less means Victory is doing a lot RIGHT on the creativity front.

In other words, the Harley-Davidson businessmen look to squeeze all the creativity out in the name of profits.  And now the business is in the hands of the manufacturing line worker, who are always the least creative element in the chain.  The engineers designed out cost, the line-worker built them at the lowest cost, the dealer sold them slightly above cost. Now the company is trying to fix the business, but are flummoxed.  Do they truly think cutting out cost, means somehow people will magically appear?

They’re not and meanwhile Victory ratchet’s up innovation.

Photo courtesy of Polaris/Victory Motorcycles.

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

Read Full Post »

timeoutAccording to a 2008 survey by Technorati, which runs a search engine for blogs, only 7.4 million out of the 133 million blogs the company tracks had been updated in the past 120 days. That translates to 95% of blogs being essentially abandoned, left to WOW (wallow on the web), where they become public remnants of a dream — or an ambition — unfulfilled.

I started blogging in 2006 which seems like a long time ago… then in 2007, prior to taking off on an extended motorcycle trip I started the Northwest Harley Blog.  The thinking at the time was that a mix of hobbies (motorcycle and photography) would be a natural fit and thus was born — rantings of a motorcycle enthusiast.

Many people start blogs with lofty aspirations — try to build an audience and leave their day job, land a book deal, get attention from traditional media or simply to share their so-called genius with the world. I did not! Some even assumed that once they started blogging, the world would beat a path to their digital door.  Getting started is easy, since all it takes to maintain a blog is a time commitment and inspiration. Some actually believe those TV advertisements about some mommy blogger making $4,000 a month?

As a “closet journalist” I like to provide a unique voice and work to accurately report and find unusual angles on stories related to motorcycle causes and the industry.  I also like to provide chronologies of my various ride and rally wanderings. After two+ years, or put another way — after 500 posts, 873 photo’s edited/uploaded, and several thousand moderated comments later I feel the blog is a successful hobby after obtaining on average 24,000 unique monthly views, but it’s also at a cross-roads.

trollThe internet is different now.  It used to be about research, accuracy and quality entries.  The good bloggers had something to say about the big motorcycle issues of the day.  Now it’s about snippets from people who pump out dreck or large excerpts of other articles.  Original and high-quality content has become dumbed down.  Bloggers are required to spend more time ‘digg-n’, ‘tweeting’, ‘facebooking‘, ‘youtubing‘ and SEOing their posts than they do on the actual posts themselves. Even H-D is pushing their social media outreach staff to pump up the noise level on marketing messages in non-traditional channels — i.e. bloggers.

Sure it’s cool to have all this media presence, you can tweet ad infinitum and make videos clips if you’ve got a burning desire to do so… especially if you love new media and are thrilled to be in constant contact with your fan base or “tribe.”  In other words, if its an end unto itself.

But, that’s what bothers me.  There is a point of diminishing returns and a mental cost to all the work.  In the early days all that was required to “win” at blogging was to show up early each day.  Today?  You need a team of social marketers to get your message out, a second team to manage any fall-out from whatever you’ve said and a third to manage all the SPAMers and deletion of bad behavior rolled up by the Google machine in the form of drive-by trolls and haters who try and take up residence.  As a result blogs have a higher failure rate than restaurants!

Not all blogs fade from lack of reader interest. Some bloggers find themselves too busy — what with, say, band-camp, and swim practice, or perhaps even housework. Others graduate to more immediate formats, like Twitter or Facebook and drop evangelizing via the blog platform. And a few — gasp — actually decide to reclaim some small slice of their personal time.  This brings me full-circle about a decision.

I’m going to take a blogging timeout. Little if any new material will appear during the month of October.  I plan to resume in November.  Why?  Having blogged consistently for over three years now, I think it would be wise to take a step back and evaluate the effects (both good and bad) and determine what if any new direction should be taken.  If you have an opinion or viewpoint I’m sure you’ll let me know.

I appreciate the allegiance of the blog reader base who subscribe and those who visit the site regularly.  If you happen on to this site during the month of October I hope you’ll enjoy looking through the archives.

Enjoy fall and ride safe out there…

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: